Friday, January 15, 2010

I Love My iPhone

I love my iPhone. It's perfect. It knows all my music and important data. It gives me access to apps that make me happy. It connects me to the Internet. It keeps me connected to the world. It feels perfect in my hand. I never leave home without it. My iPhone is like Monica Bellucci. I feel great using it. I love it. I will always love my iPhone and Apple.
I hate the AT&T network. It sucks. I don't care what Luke Wilson says. I get dropped calls. When I call people sometimes they can't understand what I'm saying. Sometimes I can't call anyone at all. Sometimes I can't get to the Internet and my apps that make me happy. In the heart of Silicon Valley, in New York City, and sometimes just here in New Jersey the network fails me. I hate the AT&T network.
This week I signed up for a Verizon plan and bought a shiny new Android phone. I'm carrying it with me all the time. It tucked into my left pocket (my iPhone is in the right). I don't love my Android/Verizon phone yet. It's clunky. It feels like high school science project. It's like Janean Garofalo. It's not as sensual or sexy as my iPhone but it doesn't drop calls! (Not yet anyway.) People can understand me when I talk to them on my Android phone. It's been connecting me to the Internet even in places where my iPhone, or rather the AT&T network fails me. Some of the apps that make me happy are starting to show up on my Android phone. They aren't as good as the versions on my iPhone but they're getting there.
I don't like carrying two phones but I need to be able to make calls and not have them drop. I need people to be able to understand me when I'm talking to them on the phone. That is the point of the phone to begin with, right? So now I'm learning to love the Verizon network. It's not perfect either because I can't be on the phone and use the data network. Hopefully they'll fix that and I can surf the web when I'm on the phone. That would make me really love them.
As for this whole iPhone/Android thing right now there is no contest. The iPhone hardware and software are far superior to anything that Android has to offer, today. Yeah, there's an approval process to get into the Apple App Store, Yeah, Apple controls the platform. All true. That may be draconian, but it does keep quality very high. On the other hand Android is very open and they are making progress. I think they will catch up eventually and you know...I've always had a thing...for Janean Garofalo.

4 Comments:

Blogger Khurt said...

Steve,
I keep hearing arguments about how the Android platform is open and the iPhone is closed but .... do consumers care? Is the consumer submitting applications to the app store? If an open platform was a selling point wouldn't Linux own the desktop and server space?

1:28 PM  
Blogger Steve Giovannetti said...

I think both platforms are more or less open. The iPhone's only big open/closed drawback is the App Store approval process which essentially controls what we can get on the phone. Not a big deal unless one of the apps you want gets blocked. I use GoogleVoice a lot and while there are "apps for that" Apple won't let me buy and run them on *my* device.
Android is, for the most part wide open but there are still parts of Android that are closed source. The recent kerfuffle over the Cyanogen ROM highlighted all is not peace and love in the Android platform. Still it is much less restrictive than the App Store debacle.
My big beef here though is the network. AT&T's network stinks. It stinks so bad that I'm carrying a second phone on another network just so I'll have reliable phone communications. That has to be giving Apple fits.

7:34 AM  
Blogger Khurt said...

I have not bought an iPhone yet because of the AT&T network. Fortunately, I can find a Wi-Fi signal most places I go, so my iPod Touch is good for now. I really hope that Apple does an LTE phone on the VZW network this year.

I'm not at all concerned about Apple's approach to an app store. I am not a developer and as a consumer I have no problem finding an app that solves a problem. 100,000 is 80,000 more than 20,000.

4:29 PM  
Blogger Ryan Moore said...

This comment has been removed by the author.

9:32 PM  

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